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  • Nash Insurance Featured on the Radio

    Team Nash Insurance is excited to participate in the upcoming Women & Business Conference at the Salt Lake Chamberin November! Listen to our own Celia Nash speak about the upcoming health insurance open enrollment dates with Derek Miller of the Salt Lake Chamber: https://soundcloud.com/user-880405671/speaking-on-business-team-nash?utm_source=clipboard&utm_medium=text&utm_campaign=social_sharing

     

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  • Question of the Week

    Question: 

    If we get called for a reference, can we just verify the former employee’s dates of employment?

    Answer: 

    Yes, it’s up to you how much or how little you share about a former employee. There’s no legal requirement to supply employment references for former employees. If you do share any information, it should be fair and accurate. Many organizations choose to share only basic information about former employees, such as dates of employment and job title. You should be consistent when providing any information to avoid any appearance of discrimination.

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  • Building Healthy HR: Good Work-Life Balance

    Join Jenny Arthur, HR Expert at Mineral, in the next webinar of our “Building Healthy HR” series, as she uncovers best practices on how to enable good work-life balance for employees.

    Watch

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  • Question of the Week

    Question: 

    Can I require applicants to have a high school diploma?

    Answer:

    We recommend that you not require applicants to have a high school diploma unless you can demonstrate that the requirement is job-related and consistent with business necessity. Requiring a diploma when it’s unrelated to the position can be discriminatory under both Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VII) and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

    Read more: Link

    The Question of the Week does not constitute legal advice and does not address state or local law.

    Answer from Rachel, SHRM-SCP

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  • What Is Discrimination?

    Discrimination is often harmful, jeopardizing people’s jobs and careers, adding to their stress, and putting their health at risk. Employers who engage in or tolerate unlawful discrimination can face devastating lawsuits.

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  • Webinar: Monkeypox Preparedness: Keys for Small Businesses

    Wednesday, September 14, 2022
    10:00 AM PT | 1:00 PM ET

     

    Register

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  • Happy Labor Day!

    From all of us at Team Nash Insurance, Happy Labor Day!

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  • Question of the Week

    Question: 

    What are the best practices for disciplining employees?

    Answer:
    Discipline is an act on the part of the employer to address and correct inappropriate behavior or a policy violation by an employee. Discipline functions both as an incentive for employees to refrain from bad behavior in the first place and as a corrective if bad behavior occurs. Common forms of discipline include oral warnings, written warnings, and termination.

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    (The Question of the Week does not constitute legal advice and does not address state or local law. Answer from Kim, SPHR, AAM, CPIW)

     

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  • Question of the Week

    Question:

    Can we require remote employees to inform us when they move to a new city or state?

    Answer:

    Yes, you can and should require that remote employees notify the company when they move. There may be compliance and tax obligations when an employee relocates to a new city or state—not only for the employee, but also for you as the employer. For example, a relocated employee may now be owed a higher minimum wage or be eligible for paid sick leave. Workers’ compensation and unemployment insurance may also be affected.

    The Question of the Week does not constitute legal advice and does not address state or local law. 

    Answer from Kim, SPHR, SHRM-SCP

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  • Nash Insurance: Question of the Week

    Question:

    Can we cut a performance improvement plan short if the employee’s performance issues have gotten substantially worse?

    Answer: 

    In general, yes. When an employee is on a performance improvement plan (PIP), and their performance has not improved and has, in fact, gotten worse, it is perfectly reasonable to cut the timeframe of the PIP short and move forward with further disciplinary action, including termination. Unless it’s written to say otherwise—and it absolutely shouldn’t be—a PIP is not a guarantee of employment for the duration of the plan. It shouldn’t alter the at-will employment relationship.

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